Dating silver plate marks who is john schneider dating

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Silver plate has its own codes in the United States and abroad.The maker or company name is usually stamped on the back of the piece along with an indication that it's plated: in America, for instance, A1, AA, EP, sterling inlaid, or silver soldered.Although they're solid metal rather than plated, they contain less silver than sterling does.These lower-grade compounds are often less costly than silver plate but don't polish up as brightly.Most of the time, you can find the answer simply by turning over the teaspoon, fish fork, ice cream saw, or cheese scoop (antique flatware is that specialized).On the reverse side, you usually find an indented mark or series of marks that holds a wealth of information about the item -- not only what it's made of, but sometimes also where, when, and by whom it was made.With the adoption of the sterling standard after the Civil War, silversmiths continued to stamp their own names on the back, along with the word sterling or the number 92.5 or 925, all of which indicate sterling quality. The Gorham company's mark was a row of three emblems: a lion (for sterling), an anchor (for its base in Rhode Island), and a "G" (its initial).Some American silversmiths mimicked British hallmarks to lend their wares prestige -- rather than to convey specific information.

England's system of hallmarks -- a variety of official emblems stamped on silver to attest to its purity -- is one of the oldest and most detailed.

With silver marks, it's a tiny world, so it's best to come prepared. Electroplated nickel silver, or EPNS, is an alloy of nickel, copper, and zinc that's covered with a layer of pure silver in an electrochemical process.

Nickel's resemblance to silver helps disguise any worn spots in the plating. (top), located in Birmingham, was Britain's biggest plate manufacturer and the world's first producer of electroplate.

Early coin silver was often marked with the maker's name, and nothing else; sometimes it doesn't show even that.

(Unmarked objects, of course, present the greatest mystery.) Eventually, manufacturers also started using the word coin.

A final tip: It's a good idea to bring a small, cheap jeweler's loupe when you go shopping. Brown manufactured this sterling piece, as indicated by the name, but the hallmarks that follow are bogus, imitating the English system because of its cachet This example of coin carries the name of the silversmith, N. On the back of this sterling fork, the lion, anchor, and "G" identify the Gorham company.

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