Dating plump women

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Maybe there'd be no need for Woo Plus, because fat individuals interested in being with someone who appreciates their fat could take to any standard dating site and not risk being told, "Sorry, you're fatter than your pictures," at an IRL meetup.

But as Schools Of Equality — a site dedicated to educating students about all facets of equality — highlights, equality isn't very feasible without equity.

It depicts fat women as being unaware of, if not entire disbelieving of, their physical attraction, while depicting men as coming in to save the day and teach them otherwise. Most fat people are told their "hotness" is 100 percent impossible. Regarding the app's emphasis on plus size women, Li tells me via email, "Woo Plus aims to provide a comfortable dating platform for all plus size singles and their admirers.

Plus, during interviews, creators Neil Raman and Michelle Li have suggested that Woo Plus is predominantly meant to help women, rather than all plus size individuals as the app's "about page" claims. However, plus size women tend to be more the focus of cruelty and body shaming as opposed to their male counterparts." While there's no stat to back that up, the inherent marginalization of women in our society is sort of evidence enough.

So in a way, I like that the founders have said that Woo Plus is "Tinder for BBW." Everyone knows Tinder is oft utilized for hooking up and nothing more.

And there's no reason that such sexual agency shouldn't be granted to fat individuals, whether they identify as BBW, BHM, or simply "plus size."In this equality-filled utopian future we so often like to imagine, maybe there'd be no need for Grindr because gay men could express their queerness openly, in all parts of the world, without concern or consequence.

We wouldn't need an "app for plus size singles and admirers to find their matches," as noted on the app's i Tunes landing page, or for "big beautiful women (BBW), big handsome men (BHM), fat admirers, chubby girl[s], Dadbod[s], curvy women, thick women, and everything in between," because the notion that fat bodies are as desirable as any other body type, in that some people find them desirable and some don't, would be understood — and not just by fat people themselves, but by all people. Refinery29's Liz Black took note of the app's "condescending ads," tweeting, "Like a plus size woman would be shocked a man thinks she's hot."Blogger Callie Thorpe of From The Corners Of The Curve told ASOS, "It feels that instead of addressing the way plus size women are treated in society — and most certainly on the dating scene — we are having to further separate them."In the same article, curve model Felicity Hayward said, "To then make a separate dating app for bigger girls is a completely backwards step.

Li told The Daily Dot, "We're just trying to provide a comfortable environment for women who happen to be a little larger." And when you go to Woo Plus' main website, the tagline, "Big girls, you’ve got more admirers than you think," will greet you. But the sentiment that Thorpe, Hayward, and Baum have all expressed with the app is one of dissatisfaction with perceived division.

Not wanting divide is definitely reasonable, and it's a feeling that can also be heard through campaigns like #Drop The Plus.

And so I cannot help but feel that the problem some folks are having isn't with the over-sexualization of fat people, and specifically fat women.

But rather, with the sexualization of a group of people we're not used to being told are, in fact, sexual beings (unless they're being branded as "promiscuous" or "desperate," that is).

A couple of years ago, I decided I'd never date anyone else who was interested in me "despite" or "regardless of" my body.

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